Dancing and Hip Replacements

Hi, I was wondering if any of you could advise me on what to tell my best friend...she wants to dance but... she has had a double hip replacement, and does from time to time dislocate her hips. She has had mime training so knows how to isolate and does horseback riding (dressage not sure of spelling). I have no idea what to tell her - she really wants to dance. Thanks Creaks.
 

PracticalDancer

New member
Hi, I was wondering if any of you could advise me on what to tell my best friend...she wants to dance but... she has had a double hip replacement, and does from time to time dislocate her hips. She has had mime training so knows how to isolate and does horseback riding (dressage not sure of spelling). I have no idea what to tell her - she really wants to dance. Thanks Creaks.
Tell her to check first with her doctor, then to find a teacher with a good reputation and training in anatomy and/or physical therapy and/or certified as a trainer -- you get the idea. Have her look for someone with a background in healthy, safe exercise in addition to the art of middle eastern dance.

Best wishes to her,

Anala
 

da Sage

New member
As someone who has had problems with one of my hips, I think she needs to get a course of appropriate strength exercises and stretching/alignment exercises from her doctor or physical therapist, and keep that up while pursuing bellydance cautiously. Some days/weeks she may just need to hold back/take a break from the dancing.

Also, she should never follow an instructor's advice blindly...she should always listen to her body and modify as necessary. Unless she makes a radical recovery/stabilization, she may wish to avoid Suhaila-inspired workshops and teachers. Suhaila's strengthening/stretching exercises put particular stress on the hip joints, IMO.
 
dancing and hip replacements

Thanks guys for the info. I think this will make her happy. I'm also thinking that maybe I should go to the dr with her to show some of the basic moves that she might do. Creaks. :)
 

maria_harlequin

New member
I agree - check it out with her doctor first :) You can even bring him a CD with videos so he can watch performances.

You mention that she does horseback riding and as a rider myself I think that puts way more stress on her hipbones than belly dancing ever would. Unless of course you mean she DID horseback riding before her hip replacement. :)
 
dancing and hip replacements

Hi, she did theraputic horseback riding before her hip replacement... i believe that her dr recommended it. She does riding now too.
 
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Hi, just a quick update - my friend is taking me to her dr appointment in june and i will show him what the hips do in dancing ect. thanks again for the advice my friend really appreciated it - Creaks
 

da Sage

New member
Hi, just a quick update - my friend is taking me to her dr appointment in june and i will show him what the hips do in dancing ect. thanks again for the advice my friend really appreciated it - Creaks
That's awesome! Be sure to show him different kinds of moves (small, subtle as well as sharp, big). I hope it's a good consultation!:)
 
dancing and hip replacements

Hi Zahra, thanks for the site... this looks perfect. I sent it to my friend and will start reading it. Thanks Creaks
 
Hello, I was wondering what type of doctor that your friend wll be seeing?
Primary care physicians(PCP) may not have all of the answers. I would recommend a doctor specializing in sports medicine or a physiatrist(a physician specializing in rehabilitation)
Yasmine
 
Hi Yasmine she was going to her hip specialist and surgeon. Her primary care doctor is someone we can talk to about this and actually show him lots of info as he is also family so he is easy to educate about this. he is the one who convinced her husband that she could indeed still ride as long as she took certain precautions.
 

Harry

Member
One of my church organists got a double hip replacement. Now, the type of organ, here, is one with a full pedal board, of 2.5 octaves. Those that understand keyboards, and such, I think will understand what I mean. Playing an organ pedal board, or klavier, requires a lot of flexibility in the legs, all the way from the hips to the feet. Anyway, the rule of thumb, as he tells it to me, is that activity that is considered "high impact" (jumping, for example) is a big no-no. So, indeed, as others have alluded, checking with the doctor would be a good idea, just to make sure.
Harry
 
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