What style is this? Simsimia?

bomu samba

New member
I found this video by Badriyah on YouTube: Badriyah Folkloric Dance

I've heard of most of these dance styles before, but at 5:10 she does a dance style called "simsimia". I have never heard of it before and my google-fu has failed me.

Could anyone tell me more about this dance style and the significance of the costuming she's chosen for it?

Thanks!
 
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Kashmir

New member
This style I've know as Bamboutiyeh/Bumbotaya from Port Said. It is an imitation of the boatmen miming what they have to sell to the big ships, fishing etc combined with footwork similar to the English sailor's jig/hornpipe.
If performed by women they are dressed as men (the traders are men, boys and girls).

The costume in this video is a little more nautical than I'd go (stretch jeans work better I think :D) - they are low class traders not ship's captains - but it does give a nautical feel. The footwork is also less vigorous than I've seen in the past - a major reason why I don't perform it.

Great idea for a video though - and well done.
 

bomu samba

New member
Thank you!

Thank you both very much for the info and link. They've helped put the dance and costume into context and I was able to find more examples of the dance on YouTube.

It's also interesting to read the political significance the music has for some in the region.

Great idea for a video though - and well done.
It's a really nice way of showing the differences between folkloric dances.
 

Farasha Hanem

New member
I found this video by Badriyah on YouTube: Badriyah Folkloric Dance

I've heard of most of these dance styles before, but at 5:10 she does a dance style called "simsimia". I have never heard of it before and my google-fu has failed me.

Could anyone tell me more about this dance style and the significance of the costuming she's chosen for it?

Thanks!
WOW WOW WOWWWW, I LOVE THIS!!! :D :dance:
 

gisela

Super Moderator
No problem :)

I love that video with Badriyah. It is so well done.

I saw a simsimeyya dance on video once, where the guy was dressed a bit nautical, with a sailor hat and striped shirt (IIRC) and with a some fishing gear. He "caught" the girl dance partner and they acted out a little "reeling in the catch" part of the dance. Possibly she had a very glittery silver costume as in fish scales, but that could be an after construction in my brain. It was a cute routine and very vigorous footwork.
 

LaurenRaqs

New member
Just adding to what's already been said, the dance itself is a mishmosh of styles from the melting pot that happened around the Suez canal when it was being built and workers came from all over the world.

Simsimiyya actually refers to an instrument, but is also applied to this dance style.

Mohammed El Hosseiny teaches workshops in this style, including spoons (commonly used in a neighboring city in the same region). He also has a DVD out. You can hunt down his youtube clips as well.

Sahra Saeeda gives an overview of the style in her Journey Through Egypt workshops.
 

bomu samba

New member
Thanks LaurenRaqs.

You've actually answered another question I had. I have seen spoons for sale on some BD / ME sites but have never seen any dancers with them - I was wondering where they were used!
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
What a great video! Oh, how I wish there was a folk dance class available somewhere closer than central Colorado (if I could find one there).
 

Jeanne

Member
Just adding to what's already been said, the dance itself is a mishmosh of styles from the melting pot that happened around the Suez canal when it was being built and workers came from all over the world.

Simsimiyya actually refers to an instrument, but is also applied to this dance style.

Mohammed El Hosseiny teaches workshops in this style, including spoons (commonly used in a neighboring city in the same region). He also has a DVD out. You can hunt down his youtube clips as well.

Sahra Saeeda gives an overview of the style in her Journey Through Egypt workshops.
Sahra's introduction to this style in the JTE workshops is very interesting; I highly recommend it if you are ever able to attend.

I was really happy to see this thread, because I've been looking into this style myself lately. Here is a fun clip of Mohammed El Hosseiny:
Simsimiyya Hosseny - YouTube
 

Tiziri

New member
That video is wonderful! I hadn't heard about this style yet and I'm really taken with it (also, the "Sing, oh simsimiyya" link is great reading). Thanks to everyone who posted. I love the folkloric styles.
 
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