International book week game

Daimona

Moderator
Something about Vikings? (after the Apron dresses discussions..?)
No it isn't. But I can give you the 4th sentence as well, and a hint that reenactors and SCA members might have an advantage on this one.. ;)

Trece, Treceor, vb. Trecier - Both the feminine and masculine forms of this term were used in the meaning of plaiting the hair in a braid, and the masculine form specifically means a ribbon used for hair braiding. Other literary references make it evident that men occasionally wore their hair long and in a braid.
 
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Shanazel

Super Moderator
Mine is from an Inspector Lynley novel called Place of Hiding. These are good detective series.

(China was not the country but the name of a girl in the book. Weird name!)
Careful there, Amulya honey. My given name is India. Really. :cool:

:lol: Not even close. I got my citation from this book (found it in the office).
Duh! And me married to a geologist; I should've known.

the young man who uttered the spells could very easily have taken advantage of a moment of distraction on my part and dropped into the room a snake that he had been concealing in his armpit all along."
Remarkable hiding place! Most men keep their snakes in their pants.

Today's page 52 quote from the nearest book: "It might be wise to settle far back in the country where Elizabeth would not be so apt to fall victim to the Virginia sickness, where fresh land was abundant but where water transportation was available for shipping out tobacco hogsheads and receiving European goods."

That was one of the shorter sentences on the page. :)
 
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Mosaic

Super Moderator
Aniseteph, is it one of the harry Potter books? - I have never read them, but the spells & snakes in armpits sound like something that could come from that series.

Snakes in armpits - very strange indeed & after Shan's comment about them, the mind plays ticks with snakes in armpits:lol::lol:
~Mosaic
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
Can't be Harry Potter, I would remember a scene like that.

I'm still intrigued about Kenneth and the lute.
It's a time travel/romance book by an author named Lynn Kurland. One of the few romance authors I'll read. (It's not actually her best book.)

Let me do the 4th sentence of my second quote also.

"I always thought him a terrible nuisance, but now I know how he felt. See here."​
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
There is an American actress who goes by the name America and Africa with a slightly different pronunciation and a totally different meaning is an old Celtic name. I've met an Aja (pronounced Asia) and a Burma whose father was an air force guy stationed there, also met an Ireland (which still sounds odd to my ear as a name). There are any number of peope named after other places: Britany, Virginia, Carolina (my daughter), Georgia, Jordan, Israel (not a common male name any more), Alabama, Florida, Montana, Nevada, Chelsea, Brooklyn, etc.

Why do you suppose the Isle of Wight, Botswana, Toad Suck, and No Man's Land have been neglected as people names? :think:
 

Darshiva

Moderator
You're so right. :D Currently I have a Teela (teal-coloured fairy) and her son Brandelbee (has bee-style wings & a brown & gold theme going on). Tragic, I know. :D
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
Brown and gold are the official colors of the University of Wyoming and the unofficial colors of the entire state. Does this Brandelbee ride rodeo, per chance?
 

Aniseteph

New member
Aniseteph, is it one of the harry Potter books? - I have never read them, but the spells & snakes in armpits sound like something that could come from that series.
Nope. (I read them all, out loud, the LOT. They kept us in bedtime stories for a good few years).

LOL at Shanazel's pants comment; I'm pretty sure they are just real snakes. I shall have to go back and read it with a Subtext now though. It's an extract from a travel diary. Where & more-or-less when? bonus points for who the author's famous travelling companion was.
 

Yshka

New member
"Okonkwo and the boys worked in complete silence, which was only broken when a new palm frond was lifted on to the wall or when a busy hen moved dry leaves about in her ceaseless search for food."

Curious to see who can tell what that is... :)
 

Sophia Maria

New member
"Okonkwo and the boys worked in complete silence, which was only broken when a new palm frond was lifted on to the wall or when a busy hen moved dry leaves about in her ceaseless search for food."

Curious to see who can tell what that is... :)
Can't fool me, that's Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. Thank you, high school ninth grade English class, and I can't believe I still remember that.
 

Sophia Maria

New member
Ok, so the first book I could grab was this: "Énervée, je ne tiens pas en place et vais rôder jusqu'à la porte de l'escalier qui conduit aux chambres 'provisoires' (toujours! ) des institutrices"

But I also have something in English close by, fortunately! Points to the person who can guess this, I love this book: "He was directly invited to join their party, but he declined it, observing, that he could imagine but two motives for their chusing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere."
 

gisela

Super Moderator
Ok, so the first book I could grab was this: "Énervée, je ne tiens pas en place et vais rôder jusqu'à la porte de l'escalier qui conduit aux chambres 'provisoires' (toujours! ) des institutrices"

But I also have something in English close by, fortunately! Points to the person who can guess this, I love this book: "He was directly invited to join their party, but he declined it, observing, that he could imagine but two motives for their chusing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere."
The english one sounds like a Jane Austen book, perhaps Pride and Prejudice?
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
The closet book du jour (please admire the only French I speak except for "Brigitte Bardot" and "bouillabaisse") has no page 52, being a Sesame Street book called What's Up in the Attic? The next closet book says:

"Some people I've showed it to have found the space a little, well, unconventional, but that's something you'll have to judge for yourselves."
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
The english one sounds like a Jane Austen book, perhaps Pride and Prejudice?
Good guess! That is definitely Pride and Prejudice. That was the phrase that had me throwing the book at the wall when I was 16. The sheer inanity of their public manners drove me batty back then; now however I love all her books.


Ok, next closest book.

..... pg 52 is blank... next book.

"After all, the Trojans had sacked as many cities and stolen as many cattle as the Achaeans who invaded them."
 
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