International book week game

Shanazel

Super Moderator
It’s international book week. The rules: Grab the closest book to you (don't go running for your favorite book!), turn to page 52, post the fifth sentence. Don’t mention the title. Let folks guess what you're reading.

Mine:

"Perhaps they are the precursors of Hungarian Point."
 

Mosaic

Super Moderator
"dowry is considered hers and remains that way during the life of the marriage"

I have no idea what you are reading Shan. Interesting but I think quite a difficult game to solve.

~Mosaic
 

Darshiva

Moderator
"As a primary weapon on this battleground, the cyberterminal is first in line for improvements."



And if you can figure out what that one is, PM me!
 

Ariadne

Well-known member
"Then he stood up, shot Kenneth another look of promise and left the studio, no doubt to look for somewhere to stash the lute so he wouldn't have to see it again."​


I have no idea for the rest of yours but now I want to read them!
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
:lol:

Silly me. How about not guess the title, but the type of book?

Mosaic: are you reading a book about marriage laws in middle eastern countries?

Darshiva: how about cyberinvestigations of white collar crime?

Ariadne: I haven't a clue. Fiction about competing musicians recording renaissance music?
 

Amulya

Moderator
'so it was a... well, rather a bond between China and me'

This sentence is so misleading, it could easily be read differently from the context. I don't think anyone can guess this book.
 
Last edited:

Daimona

Moderator
Shanazel: You are reading about embroideries, aren't you?


Ok, I had to find a book in English. Iguess posting a citation from a Norwegian book could be quite challenging for you. This one ought to be fun:

A fabric is made up of a number of fabric elements each consisting of a group of geometric features of the same kind.
 

Shanazel

Super Moderator
A book on weaving, Daimona?

An Amy Tan novel, Amulya?

Maybe we can write our very own plagerized book this way. To whit:

Perhaps they are the precursors of Hungarian Point; I don’t know. In any case, the dowry is considered hers and remains that way during the life of the marriage. Not that it is a good marriage: as a primary weapon on this battleground, the cyberterminal is first in line for improvements.
Without warning, he stood up, shot Kenneth another look of promise and left the studio, no doubt to look for somewhere to stash the lute so he wouldn't have to see it again. Kenneth watched him go without comment. Mama was in bed, covered in a silken sheet that he’d woven with his own hands. He didn’t like buying foreign goods, but by making this sheet with imported thread, it was a... "well, rather a bond between China and me," he thought. After all, no matter who weaves the cloth, a fabric is made up of a number of fabric elements each consisting of a group of geometric features of the same kind.

By the way, Dai, my line was from A Pageant of Pattern for Needlepoint Canvas which my friend Ann and I've been using to plan a year-long course for our EGA chapter called "Around the World with a Needle and Thread". The first stitches to be taught are Raised Maltese Cross and Maltese Cross Ground. Ann is reading up on the history of the stitches and the culture of Malta for a short background lecture. I'm giving a short talk on color and value as it relates to this combination and, most important of all, I am bringing the malted milk balls for dessert. :)

And what are your excuses for the books you have hanging around the house?
 
Last edited:

Amulya

Moderator
Mine is from an Inspector Lynley novel called Place of Hiding. These are good detective series.

(China was not the country but the name of a girl in the book. Weird name!)
 

Darshiva

Moderator
Darshiva: how about cyberinvestigations of white collar crime?
Not even close. ;)

I'll give a hint.... it's an RPG manual. Your job, should you choose to accept it, is to tell me what system it is. If you get the version number right, bonus points. And one internet to the person who correctly guesses the name of the manual!
 
Last edited:

Mosaic

Super Moderator
Shan, The line from the book I'm reading is just a tiny bit about marriage in the ME. The book is by an Australian Journalist Christine Hogan & is called "The Veiled Lands - A woman's Journey into the heart of the Islamic world".

It's very interesting book, and is certainly wetting my appetite to travel more extensively in the ME and to do so with folk who actually live in the countries or can open doors away from the touristy paths.
~M

Here is a review:
Like many Australians, Christine Hogan was fascinated, bemused and more than a little apprehensive of the Islamic world. But overcoming her trepidation, she decided the only way to gain any understanding of Islam - the religion, the culture and the people - was to see things first hand. Travelling through Libya, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt and the Gulf States, Christine embarked on a journey of discovery. While coping with stroppy camels, plagues of locusts, and getting lost in the Sahara and a souq or two, Christine also came to appreciate the beauty and complexity of the Middle East, and a kindness and hospitality unrivalled anywhere else in the world. She soon found her old assumptions making way for new insights.

Interwoven with Christine's experiences are the stories of some of the women who belong to the history of the Middle East: the first Muslim, a woman called Khadija; Florence Nightingale; Isabel Burton, wife of Sir Richard; the intrepid Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who gained unprecedented access to the wives and mistresses of the Ottoman court in the 18th century; and the Swiss adventuress Isabelle Eberhardt, who cross-dressed her way across North Africa in the late 19th century and became a devout Muslim.
 

Mosaic

Super Moderator
Here's another one, it might be a bit easier to guess, I'm sure some of you have read this one. just grabbed behind me, I read it a couple of years ago.
Page 52 line 5:
A month after returning to Berkeley, Mortenson got a letter from his mother.

~M
 

Farasha Hanem

New member
:lol: Not even close. I got my citation from this book (found it in the office).

Fun compilations of citations, btw, and of course the book should be called "The fifth line of page 52"
Never mind my pm, for one thing, I didn't read the post I quoted until just now. :confused: Another reason, it couldn't be what I'd guessed, anyway. :confused:
 

Daimona

Moderator
Never mind my pm, for one thing, I didn't read the post I quoted until just now. :confused: Another reason, it couldn't be what I'd guessed, anyway. :confused:
No worries. I wouldn't have guessed it myself either. :lol:

Here is a new citation:
Other literary references make it evident that men occasionally wore their hair long and in a braid.
 
Last edited:

Ariadne

Well-known member
Ariadne: I haven't a clue. Fiction about competing musicians recording renaissance music?
Fiction yes, competing musicians no.

And what are your excuses for the books you have hanging around the house?
Well I borrowed that one from my sister which is why it was sitting on my desk. The next closest book (from another sister) has:

"See here."​

Yeah, that's not obscure. ;)

Not even close. ;)

I'll give a hint.... it's an RPG manual. Your job, should you choose to accept it, is to tell me what system it is. If you get the version number right, bonus points. And one internet to the person who correctly guesses the name of the manual!
Is it from Shadowrun?

Or maybe GURPS Cyberpunk?
 

Safran

New member
Haha, the closest book:

"See foto oli paaris pildiga, mis kujutas õlgadest ära lõigatud alasti meest, kes oli seljaga kaamera poole."

The closest English book:

""When you do this job as long as I have, your intuition almost never misses."
 

Aniseteph

New member
Other literary references make it evident that men occasionally wore their hair long and in a braid.
Something about Vikings? (after the Apron dresses discussions..?)

"The thing was well done, I admit, but it did not convince me; the young man who uttered the spells could very easily have taken advantage of a moment of distraction on my part and dropped into the room a snake that he had been concealing in his armpit all along."

I'm still intrigued about Kenneth and the lute.
 
Top